SUBSCRIBE NOW AND SAVE 3 months just 99¢/month

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

WeatherTalk: Making snow from boiling water

This is essentially how snowflakes form in a cloud.

Cartoon of John Wheeler with a speech bubble depicting weather events

Many of us have seen the magic of tossing a pan of boiling water into the air in 20 below zero cold in which the boiling water instantly turns into snow. This works in very cold conditions because very cold air has an extremely limited capacity for water vapor. The container of boiling water is, naturally, in a state of producing water vapor. That is precisely what boiling water does.

As this boiling water is sprayed into the frigid air, the water in the container is spread out into smaller and smaller blobs, resulting in more surface area of boiling water, which produces more water vapor. But the cold air has no room for it, so the vapor is forced to form into much denser ice crystals. This is essentially how snowflakes form in a cloud, although the in-cloud snow growth process is considerably slower and less dramatic.

Related Topics: WEATHER
What to read next
The average number of blizzards in a winter is three.
Highs will only make it into the teens today with a breeze keeping a chilly feel to the air.
Strong eruptions in the tropics have been known to cause cooling due to large amounts of sulphur dioxide being placed into the upper atmosphere.
Winds will pick up today with a chance of snow arriving late in the day.